• The League of Women Voters has a long history with candidate debates.  Between 1960 and 1984, the League sponsored every presidential and vice presidential candidate debate.  The League may no longer sponsor these televised debates, but state and local Leagues across the country continue to sponsor candidate debates at the state and local levels, just as they always have.

  • At the end of last week, refreshed from a few short days at home in Georgia, I hit the road again this time on a two state swing starting in Colorado and wrapping up in Missouri. In Colorado, I continued to meet with our partner organizations, meet our on-the-ground members and volunteers doing everything they can to get their communities ready for the November elections, and had the opportunity to meet with the Colorado Secretary of State.

  • I’ve just come from the Membership and Leadership Development training with League members in Illinois and I’m struck by the passion, knowledge and commitment of these true defenders of democracy.

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  • After a sixteen year period in which there were no public presidential debates, the League of Women Voters Education Fund (LWVEF) sponsored three presidential debates in 1976.

  • The Iowa Caucuses are less than a week away – an early kickoff to what will surely be a long and intense election year 2012. Instead of the usual New Year's resolutions, the League is putting together a list of Election Year Resolutions/Hopes for the upcoming year:

  • At every level of government—from city council to state legislature, from Congress to President of the United States—candidates participate in debates to help voters understand who they are and what they stand for. But are you actually getting anything out of these debates?
  • Elections present voters with important choices. Whether it is a local race that will affect your community or a national race that could change the direction of the country, it is a time to consider the issues which you care about and decide which candidate you support. Even if you are under 18 and not yet eligible to vote, election campaigns offer an excellent way to learn about the people and issues that affect your future.

  • Introduction

    Candidate debates have a long history in American politics. At every level of government—from city council to state legislature, from Congress to President of the United States—candidates participate in debates to help voters understand who and what they stand for.

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