Skip to main content

Census

The U.S. Census is required under the U.S. Constitution to occur every 10 years and is the process of counting every resident in the country. For the first time ever, in 2020 the Census will be primarily digitally based.

Why it matters

The U.S. Census data is used to make decisions around education, healthcare, infrastructure, and political representation. With increased growth in the country, getting an accurate and complete count of every person living within is crucial to ensure that each state receives funding to support the number of residents in each state. This Census the focus continues to be on reaching hard to count communities and ensuring these communities get included in the Census count.

What we're doing

The League’s Census work will occur in three phases: (1) Education; (2) Get Out to Count activities, (3) Watchdog reporting. In the months leading up to Census Day—April 1, 2020—Leagues around the country will be in communities sharing information and resources about how to participate and the importance of the U.S. Census. On Census Day, the League will work in coalition to help get everyone counted, work in Complete Count Committees to share out information about low-reporting areas, and communicate where additional support is needed. Once the Census count wraps up in the Summer/Fall of 2020, the League’s will remain in communities and will watchdog any issues from the ground.

Census In Depth

LWVUS submitted substantive comments to the U.S.  Census Bureau on the 2020 Address Canvassing operation.

The League sent a memo to the U.S.  House regarding the citizenship question on the U.S. Census.

The League submitted organizational comments regarding the inclusion of the citizenship question on the 2020 Census.

The U.S. House Oversight and Government Reform Committee continues to explore the proposal of a question related to citizenship on the 2020 Census.

The League sent a letter to the U.S. House Oversight and Government Affairs Committee urging the committee to use its power and remove the citizenship question from the 2020 Census.

It is up to Congress to exercise oversight authority over the Census Bureau and  remove the citizenship question from the 2020 Census. 

 

The League joined letters calling on the committees of jurisdiction in the U.S. Senate and  House to address the inclusion of a citizenship question on the 2020 Census. 

For the first time in more than half a century, the decennial census will ask respondents to indicate whether they’re a U.S. citizen or not.

The League joined 168 national, state and local organizations in urging the President to nominate a highly qualified and widely respected professional to serve as the next Director of the U.S. Census Bureau.

Evenwel v. Abbott, a case out of Texas, has the potential to upset the criteria for drawing state and local legislative districts so that they would be determined by the total number of voters instead of total population. The League submitted an amicus brief in Evenwel that supports the current practice of drawing district lines.