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Money in Politics

Elections should be about the voters not big money interests. It’s time to limit SuperPACs and secret donors to protect representative democracy.

Why it matters

Reducing the influence of big money in our politics makes our elections fairer. Voters have the right to know who is raising money for which political candidates, how much money they are raising and how that money is being spent. Our elections should be free from corruption and undue influence and should work so that everyday Americans can run for office, even if they aren't well connected to wealthy special interests. 

What we're doing

We fight to reform money in politics in Congress, with state legislatures, with the executive branch and, where appropriate, the courts. We are deeply committed to reforming our nation's campaign finance system to ensure the public's right to know, combat corruption and undue influence, and enable candidates to compete more equitably in public office and allow maximum citizen participation in the political process. 

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Money in Politics In Depth

Dark money and special interests do not need extra loopholes to undermine democracy. The League is committed to protecting our disclosure laws and preserving the ethics and accountability of our electoral system. 

The U.S. Supreme Court struck down a California reporting rule designed to prevent charitable fraud and self-dealing.

The League joined a letter led by the Leadership Conference in support of two critical pieces of legislation needed to protect the freedom to vote: For the People Act (FTPA) and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act (VRAA). Passage of both bills is essential to counter the unprecedented wave of voter suppression laws advancing in the states and to protect Americans from further encroachments on their rights. Passing one without the other simply will not be sufficient to ensure that all Americans—and particularly Americans of color—have meaningful and equal access to the ballot.

The League of Women Voters of California, Campaign Legal Center (CLC), Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), and Common Cause submitted an amicus brief to the U.S. Supreme Court (SCOTUS) in Americans for Prosperity Foundation v. Becerra.

Voters have an interest in knowing where politicians and organizations are getting their money and how that money is being spent. To that end, dark-money and wealthy special interest groups do not need more loopholes.

LWVUS sent a letter to Senate and House leadership outlining our continued support for the legislation commonly referred to as HR1 or the For the People Act. 

As campaigns prepare to file their latest campaign finance reports, the League has signed onto a letter along with its partners, asking candidates to publicly disclose information about bundlers.

LWVUS joined a coalition of groups supporting the Coronavirus Oversight and Recovery Ethics Act (CORE Act).

LWVUS joined a letter sent to the White House and staff of Senators McConnell, Blunt, Schumer and Klobuchar asking them to make appointments to the Federal Election Commission (FEC).

Throughout 2019 the League defended democracy in the courts on issues relating to voting rights, redistricting, money in politics, and improving elections.