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The upcoming 116th Congress could make history with the first comprehensive package of democracy reforms scheduled for 2019, HR1. Since the announcement of HR1, LWVUS has been talking to folks on the Hill and working with partner organizations to help shape the bill’s language and ensure that voting rights are strengthened by this important legislation. 

Two important reports on climate change were released in the past few weeks: the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change special report and the US National Climate Assessment. Together, these reports sound the loudest alarm yet that devastating climate change is happening now and will continue to get far worse without immediate, large-scale action.

On November 6th, Missouri voters approved Amendment 1 with a 62% majority – demonstrating a commitment and desire to clean up Missouri politics.

This past Election Day, Michigan voters used the power of their ballots to transfer the responsibility of drawing state and legislative districts to an independent redistricting commission, as well as expand access to the polls by approving two Michigan initiatives: Proposals 2 and 3. 

On November 6, 2018, Coloradoans voted to pass Amendments Y and Z, two key redistricting ballot initiatives made possible by the League and coalition partners in Colorado.

Every Election Day, League of Women Voters volunteers participate in election protection in order to ensure that voters are treated reasonably and fairly. In 2018, we saw some of the biggest problems in Georgia, where voters waited for up to five hours to vote. Watch our video to hear some real stories from real voters on Election Day.

Studies have shown that talking about voting makes people more likely to vote. People are social creatures that want to join in when everyone else is doing something. Talking about voting can make your conversation partners more likely to vote because they know that other people are voting.

The LWVNC v. Rucho case is a partisan gerrymandering challenge to the North Carolina congressional map. Partisan gerrymandering is the practice of drawing electoral district lines in a way that discriminates against a political party.

In states across the country, the League is working to put the power to draw lines in the hands of the people, not politicians.

This week, I had the privilege to attend a talk by Arturo Vargas at the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO) on Latinos and the 2018 election.