Skip to main content

Blog

In the past year, the League has joined litigation to fight back against the flood of anti-abortion bills that have been put forward across the country.   

The Native women of Haudenosaunee played a vital role in the women’s suffrage movement. Their way of living — equal participation in their government and societal roles — heavily influenced the movement’s early stages. 
Although the largest impacts to limit climate change will come from countries and corporations, individuals can make a difference as well, especially by applying pressure and sharing their thoughts with elected officials.  What can we do today to make a difference?  
On November 3rd, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of New York State Rifle and Pistol Association v Bruen, marking one of the first times that the Supreme Court will address the scope of the 2nd amendment since 2008.  Their decision will have a significant impact on election safety.
On October 20, the League of Women Voters hosted a panel discussion on the state of democracy with four distinguished members of Congress. The panelists included Congresswomen Terri Sewell (AL-7), Jackie Speier (CA-14), Lauren Underwood (IL-14), and Nikema Williams (GA-5). Invitations were extended to Congresswomen from all parties. 
Wednesday, Oct. 20, the Freedom to Vote Act came up for its first ever vote on the Senate floor. However, the bill failed to reach the 60-vote threshold needed to move forward, hitting a procedural roadblock on its way to protecting our democracy and expanding the voting rights of every American. 

People often refer to climate change as an “existential threat.” This makes sense; our existence is being threatened. But as a health professional, I’d like to move away from the big, existential side of things and focus on the everyday public and individual human health threats that climate change is already causing and that most certainly will continue to worsen.   

The world of democracy and voting rights is no different. Last week, we highlighted just a few of the change-makers that allow organizations like the League to exist today. Now, we'd like to highlight a few that we know very well: members of Team LWV.
Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 – Oct. 15) is a time to recognize and celebrate the achievements and contributions of Hispanic and Latinx Americans. This month, I want to highlight four trailblazers who’ve fought for the rights of women and paved the way for the next generation of civil rights activists.   
We need you to be the leader that will get these bills across the finish line. Protecting voting rights is the key to addressing all the issues that are keeping all of us up at night.