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National Voter Registration Day (NVRD) is just around the corner! This year, a record-breaking 400 League of Women Voters affiliates nationwide have already signed up to hit the streets and help register voters as part of National Voter Registration Day on Tuesday, September 25. 

After three days of hearings, this is what we’ve learned about Judge Kavanaugh’s record as it relates to our priority issues.

When the 2012 Presidential Election season approached, excitement rushed through me. For the first time in my life, I was eligible to participate in a presidential election. I’d previously voted in local and midterm elections, but the presidential election felt like the ‘real deal’.

September is National Voter Registration Month—and Leagues across the country are working hard to make sure eligible voters are registered to vote.

Ninety-eight years ago, on August 26th, after decades of tireless advocacy, women finally won the right to vote with the adoption of the 19th Amendment—opening the democratic process to more than 23 million women.  

The Trump Administration announced their plan to gut the Obama Administration regulation that combats climate change by setting the first-ever federal limits on carbon pollution from power plants.

Throughout our history, the League has not always been welcoming to women of color. As we approach our 100th anniversary, we are not only striving for better, we will do better.

League of Women Voters volunteers nationwide have passed a major milestone: hosting more than 600 school registration drives and registering nearly 20,000 students to vote so far this year.

Monday morning, the Center for American Progress hosted a panel discussion examining pro-voter and anti-corruption strategies to make government work more effectively for American democracy.

Voting rights advocates across the country celebrated a momentous victory last month when a federal judge struck down a Kansas statute requiring documentary proof of U.S. citizenship to register to vote. The ability to participate in American elections is the foundation of our democratic institutions, but the passage of the Secure and Fair Elections (SAFE) Act in 2013 has blocked thousands of Kansans from registering to vote through the DMV or other means.