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There are many different roles election workers can play, from ensuring that polling places are accessible for those with disabilities to counting ballots to running a polling site.

To learn more, we interviewed Pinny Sheoran, president-elect of the League of Women Voters of Arizona, Isabel Longoria, former League of Women Voters of Texas Board member and current Harris County elections administrator, and Debra Cronmiller, executive director of the League of Women Voters of Wisconsin, both of whom have extensive experience as election workers.

In November of 2018, voters passed ballot initiatives in three states to curb gerrymandering by reforming the redistricting process. Four years later, as redistricting battles once again sweep the nation, it’s time to look back at what those initiatives accomplished, and what still needs to be done. 

The 2021 redistricting cycle was the first one without the full protection of the Voting Rights Act. Without federal oversight, many states and local municipalities have used this advantage to implement racially gerrymandered maps, i.e. district lines that limit the voting power of voters of color.

The League is fortunate enough to have been a part of women's political power for over 100 years, from the days of the suffragists to the first female Vice President. Our female staff reflects on what womanhood means to them, and how it has shaped both their lives and our democracy. 

March 26th marks the third anniversary of the landmark Rucho v. League of Women Voters of North Carolina (also known as Rucho v. Common Cause) Supreme Court oral arguments. The Supreme Court's ultimate decision, that federal courts cannot make determinations on partisan gerrymandering, would have major consequences for representation across our democracy.

We spoke with Allison Riggs, who was chosen to represent the plaintiffs and argued the case before the Supreme Court. Now, Riggs, who is now co-executive director and chief counsel for the Southern Coalition for Social Justice, gives us her first-hand account of what happened in the courts.

COVID-19 brought pain, loss, and loneliness, but in the case of our democracy, it also brought important lessons. We saw firsthand how we could make our democracy available to more voters, honoring the voices of low-income, BIPOC, disabled, and other Americans. We must build on this knowledge and not waste it or use it to restrict the voter further.

In the US, most people take for granted that ample food and clean water are, and will be, available for consumption. Yet climate change has already impacted food and water resources here and around the world.

With the new year comes more litigation. In the past year, the League has continued our work of fighting against anti-voter bills and purges, challenges to new district maps, and pushing back against the increased attacks on reproductive rights. Here are a handful of the issues you may want to keep an eye on in 2022. 

Our Semi-Annual Survey Project is a central component of transforming our culture. Our most recent survey, in the Fall of 2021, provided important information on Leagues’ activities, partnerships, legislative priorities, and diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts. Here’s is what we are learning.

Our March 3 panel brought together a group of empowering women leaders: Amanda Brown Lierman, SuperMajority executive director; Sindy M. Benavides, League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) CEO, LaTosha Brown, co-founder of Black Voters Matter, and Virginia Kase Solomón, CEO of the League of Women Voters of the United States (LWVUS). 

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