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Fighting Voter Suppression

We challenge all efforts and tactics that threaten our democracy and limit the ability of voters to exercise their right to vote.

Why it matters

Voting rights are under attack. In recent years, politicians in dozens of states have erected intentional barriers to our right to vote, including forcing discriminatory voter ID and proof-of-citizenship restrictions on eligible voters, reducing polling place hours in communities of color, cutting early voting opportunities and illegally purging voters from the rolls.

What we're doing

We are at the forefront of the most important federal and state voting rights cases around the country. We actively oppose discriminatory voter photo ID laws, fight against attacks voter registration process and hold lawmakers accountable when they try to institute last-minute Election Day barriers. We work year-round to combat voter suppression through advocacy, grassroots organizing, legal action and public education. Our efforts have resulted in the protection of voting rights and ballot access for millions of Americans.

Fighting Voter Suppression In Depth

Chapel Hill, NC – The League of Women Voters of North Carolina is committed to fair elections and strongly supports the Board of Elections’ decision to delay certification of the results of the 9th Congressional District election until a thorough investigation has been conducted. The integrity of our election process must be ensured, and those responsible for undermining our democracy should be held accountable.

Every Election Day, League of Women Voters volunteers participate in election protection in order to ensure that voters are treated reasonably and fairly. In 2018, we saw some of the biggest problems in Georgia, where voters waited for up to five hours to vote. Watch our video to hear some real stories from real voters on Election Day.

The League celebrates 2018 midterms voting rights victories in Florida, Maryland, and Michigan. When it came to issues of elections, voters overwhelmingly selected to expand voting rights.

The LWVNC v. Rucho case is a partisan gerrymandering challenge to the North Carolina congressional map. Partisan gerrymandering is the practice of drawing electoral district lines in a way that discriminates against a political party.

This November, Florida voters will be presented with Amendment 4—a ballot amendment that would restore voting rights to people who were convicted of a felony offense, but have since served their sentences, completed parole or probation, and paid restitution (except for cases of murder or sexual assault charges).

The League of Women Voters of Arizona filed a lawsuit against the Arizona Secretary of State for violating the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA). 

Ninety-eight years ago, on August 26th, after decades of tireless advocacy, women finally won the right to vote with the adoption of the 19th Amendment—opening the democratic process to more than 23 million women.  

The decision to keep polling places open in Randolph County is a victory for African American voters. But in 2018, it should never have been an issue.

The League submitted organizational comments regarding the inclusion of the citizenship question on the 2020 Census.

The League sent a memo to the U.S. Senate outlining four questions that should be asked of any U.S. Supreme Court nominee during the confirmation process.