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Fighting Voter Suppression

We challenge all efforts and tactics that threaten our democracy and limit the ability of voters to exercise their right to vote.

Why it matters

Voting rights are under attack. In recent years, politicians in dozens of states have erected intentional barriers to our right to vote, including forcing discriminatory voter ID and proof-of-citizenship restrictions on eligible voters, reducing polling place hours in communities of color, cutting early voting opportunities and illegally purging voters from the rolls.

What we're doing

We are at the forefront of the most important federal and state voting rights cases around the country. We actively oppose discriminatory voter photo ID laws, fight against attacks voter registration process and hold lawmakers accountable when they try to institute last-minute Election Day barriers. We work year-round to combat voter suppression through advocacy, grassroots organizing, legal action and public education. Our efforts have resulted in the protection of voting rights and ballot access for millions of Americans.

Fighting Voter Suppression In Depth

The League submitted organizational comments regarding the inclusion of the citizenship question on the 2020 Census.

The League sent a memo to the U.S. Senate outlining four questions that should be asked of any U.S. Supreme Court nominee during the confirmation process. 

Voting rights advocates across the country celebrated a momentous victory last month when a federal judge struck down a Kansas statute requiring documentary proof of U.S. citizenship to register to vote. The ability to participate in American elections is the foundation of our democratic institutions, but the passage of the Secure and Fair Elections (SAFE) Act in 2013 has blocked thousands of Kansans from registering to vote through the DMV or other means. 

The American people deserve to know where a nominee stands on basic principles, as the Court's decisions will affect the direction of our democracy for decades to come.

Incoming CEO Virginia Kase told Glamour her vision for the League: Helping as many Americans as possible exercise their right to vote.

Shelby County v. Holder was a landmark case addressing the constitutionality of two provisions of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Here's what's happened in the five years since the case was decided.

Today, the Supreme Court ruled against Ohio voters by upholding the state's purging practice for those voters who did not vote in a single election.

U.S. Supreme Court allows Ohio to purge voting rolls.

The U.S. House Oversight and Government Reform Committee continues to explore the proposal of a question related to citizenship on the 2020 Census.