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Health Care Reform

Every U.S. resident should have access to affordable, quality health care, including birth control and the privacy to make reproductive choices.  

Why it matters

The U.S. health care system should provide a basic level of quality health care at an affordable cost to all U.S. residents. Basic care includes disease prevention, primary care (including prenatal and reproductive health), acute long-term care, mental health care, as well as health promotion and education. Health care policy goals should include the equitable distribution of services and delivery of care, advancement of medical research and technology, and a reasonable total national expenditure level. 

What we're doing

Over the past 20 years, we have lobbied for health care policy solutions, including the Affordable Care Act (ACA), to control costs and ensure a basic level of care for all. Throughout the health care debates of the past few decades, Leagues worked to provide millions of Americans across the country with objective information about the health care system and its significant reforms. This included organizing community education projects, holding public forums and debates, creating and distributing resource materials, and engaging leading policy makers and analysts. 

Health Care Reform In Depth

The League joined with 61 other health care and reproductive rights organizations in support of $327 million in funding for the Title X Family Planning program in a letter to House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittee Chairs and Ranking Minority members.

On the sixth anniversary of the signing of the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. Supreme Court will be hearing arguments in the case of Zubik v. Burwell, which challenges the health care law's contraceptive coverage provision.

The League of Women Voters joined an amicus brief in the case of Zubik v. Burwell, a challenge to the contraception accommodation in the Affordable Care Act.

In addition to lobbying the 114th Congress in support of our priorities, the League is working on a number of important policy proposals put forth by the President and agencies of the federal government. We will also be participating in litigation that could have a major impact on laws and regulations.

For several years, the League of Women Voters and our partners have been lobbying to bring the health care exchanges required by the Affordable Care Act into compliance with the National Voter Registration Act. This week, we delivered a letter to the President asking for voluntary compliance and alerting the Administration to our intent to sue, if necessary.

I will be stepping down in a few weeks after 15 years as the League’s executive director. I am confident that the League will continue its work to make American democracy as good as the ideals on which the country was founded.

Fifty years ago this week, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Social Security Amendments into law thereby creating two of our most influential federal programs – Medicaid and Medicare.

“The Affordable Care Act has been a transformative law. It has helped bring us closer to where we should be: a nation that ensures access to affordable, quality health care for all. Today’s decision reinforces the bedrock of our nation’s health care system.”

The League joined an amicus brief in King v. Burwell that focused on the impact of the Affordable Care Act on women’s health, arguing that the tax subsidies are essential to women’s health and the ACA’s continued viability.

The League’s advocacy work in the courts, just like our lobbying in Congress and with the Executive, builds our influence in the political process.