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Money in Politics

Elections should be about the voters not big money interests. It’s time to limit SuperPACs and secret donors to protect representative democracy.

Why it matters

Reducing the influence of big money in our politics makes our elections fairer. Voters have the right to know who is raising money for which political candidates, how much money they are raising and how that money is being spent. Our elections should be free from corruption and undue influence and should work so that everyday Americans can run for office, even if they aren't well connected to wealthy special interests. 

What we're doing

We fight to reform money in politics in Congress, with state legislatures, with the executive branch and, where appropriate, the courts. We are deeply committed to reforming our nation's campaign finance system to ensure the public's right to know, combat corruption and undue influence, and enable candidates to compete more equitably or public office and allow maximum citizen participation in the political process. 

Money in Politics In Depth

“The League of Women Voters supports U.S. Senate Bill. 2219, the Disclose Act of 2012, and urges all Oklahomans to join them.”

The League signed on to an amicus brief sent to the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of American Tradition Partnership vs. Montana. The case asks the U.S.

We are all aware that the huge amount of special interest money, particularly in federal races, has been a problem for years. We also know that these problems have been magnified by the Supreme Court ruling in the Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission case which unleashed corporate spending for supposedly independent campaign expenditures and which has resulted in millions and millions of dollars in secret contributions.

Today, a Senate Committee takes up the issue of money in politics, specifically, whether we need disclosure of who is spending vast amounts of money in American elections.  The League is deeply concerned about the current state of political financing in our nation. 

The following statement Statement by Elisabeth MacNamara, President League of Women Voters of the United States on The DISCLOSE Act of 2012, S. 2219 was read for the Senate Rules Committee on March 29, 2012.

 ABC NEWS reports: “Nine government watchdog groups today called on the 2012 presidential candidates to lift the veil of secrecy that shrouds their biggest fundraisers, the so-called ‘bundlers’ who use their connections to steer millions of dollars from well-heeled donors to the campaigns of their choice.”
 

“Nine government watchdog organizations today asked Republican presidential candidates Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Ron Paul and Newt Gingrich, as well as President Barack Obama, to reveal more details about fundraisers for their presidential campaigns who ‘bundle’ contributions in amounts greatly exceeding what they're permitted to contribute on their own.”

WASHINGTON (March 13, 2012) -- Nine government watchdog organizations today asked Republican presidential candidates Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Ron Paul and Newt Gingrich, as well as President Bar

“‘If we can't get the money out, we should at least know who's spending the money,’ Elisabeth MacNamara, the president of the League of Women Voters, told the Alley.”

  LEAGUE AND PARTNERS SURPASS FEC PETITION GOAL Await Response from President Obama on Enforcing Campaign Finance Laws Washington, DC - Today, the League of Women Voters announced they had surpassed their goal of 25,000 petition signatures on the White House "We the People" website that asks President Obama to appoint new commissioners to the malfunctioning Federal Election Commission (FEC).  The League and partners Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), Campaign Legal Center, Common Cause, Democracy21 and Public Citizen launched the petition drive on January 11 in order to get a response from the Administration on this critical issue that, to date, it has ignored. "The Obama campaign’s decision this week to allow surrogates to assist Super PACs in raising funds illustrates how broken the system is and that the FEC is asleep at the switch," said Elisabeth MacNamara, national League President.  "The only reason that the leading presidential campaigns of both political parties are able to work with the Super PACs is that the FEC is not enforcing the law. Indeed the FEC says this is acceptable.  Our democracy needs a fully-functioning FEC," said MacNamara.