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Money in Politics

Elections should be about the voters not big money interests. It’s time to limit SuperPACs and secret donors to protect representative democracy.

Why it matters

Reducing the influence of big money in our politics makes our elections fairer. Voters have the right to know who is raising money for which political candidates, how much money they are raising and how that money is being spent. Our elections should be free from corruption and undue influence and should work so that everyday Americans can run for office, even if they aren't well connected to wealthy special interests. 

What we're doing

We fight to reform money in politics in Congress, with state legislatures, with the executive branch and, where appropriate, the courts. We are deeply committed to reforming our nation's campaign finance system to ensure the public's right to know, combat corruption and undue influence, and enable candidates to compete more equitably in public office and allow maximum citizen participation in the political process. 

Money in Politics In Depth

The Federal Election Commission is now receiving public comments about steps they should take “to address corruption in the political process.” We need you to tell the FEC to act and enforce the law.

Today, after months of relentless attack ads and millions of dollars in dark money campaign spending, American voters are casting their ballots and making their voices heard.

The League sent a letter to the U.S. Senate in support of the DISCLOSE Act of 2014.

The League joined a letter to U.S. Senators urging them to pass the DISCLOSE Act of 2014.

The League joined an amicus brief filed in the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Lair v. Motl.

The League held its 51st biennial national convention this week, in which League members from around the country discussed important public policy issues and celebrated the organization’s accomplishments on voting rights, campaign finance reform and the environment and more.

Read a guest blog post by the League of Women Voters of California on their advocacy campaign that resulted in a big win for campaign disclosure.

A Primer for Engagement of League Members and Fellow Citizens - 2014

I work with a variety of League volunteers every day, but I also have the unique opportunity to work with the LWVUS Lobby Corps. Established in 1971, Lobby Corps convenes for briefings on League legislative priorities, and they play a key role in promoting League issues and communicating LWVUS positions to members of Congress.