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Money in Politics

Elections should be about the voters not big money interests. It’s time to limit SuperPACs and secret donors to protect representative democracy.

Why it matters

Reducing the influence of big money in our politics makes our elections fairer. Voters have the right to know who is raising money for which political candidates, how much money they are raising and how that money is being spent. Our elections should be free from corruption and undue influence and should work so that everyday Americans can run for office, even if they aren't well connected to wealthy special interests. 

What we're doing

We fight to reform money in politics in Congress, with state legislatures, with the executive branch and, where appropriate, the courts. We are deeply committed to reforming our nation's campaign finance system to ensure the public's right to know, combat corruption and undue influence, and enable candidates to compete more equitably in public office and allow maximum citizen participation in the political process. 

Money in Politics In Depth

Court Repeats Naïve, Uninformed Errors of Its Citizens United Decision

The Court's decision today in a pivotal campaign finance case has repeated its naïve, uninformed errors from its Citizens United decision.  The First Amendment is meant to protect essential freedoms, not as a weapon to destroy American democracy.  We look forward to the day when the Supreme Court majority deals with facts rather than imposing their own ideological views.

“The League of Women Voters of Ohio is deeply concerned about the current state of political financing in our nation.”

“Our election system is literally awash in money, and the 2012 election will again shatter all spending records. The amount of money from wealthy special interests, millionaires and billionaires coursing through the Wisconsin recall election and the presidential election corrodes public faith in our democracy.”

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Campaign Finance Experts, John Zogby Address Delegates

“The League of Women Voters chose Maine and Tennessee as the only states where the ads will run, believing senators in the two states are ‘key actors’ in congressional decisions on campaign finance laws, said Elisabeth McNamara, league president, in a news release.”

“The League of Women Voters of New Hampshire decries the current state of political financing in our nation. Rather than focusing on the concerns of voters, campaigns focus too heavily on raising money.”

“The League of Women Voters of Tennessee is deeply concerned about the current state of political financing in our nation. Rather than focusing on the concerns of voters, too often campaigns and candidates focus too heavily on raising funds.”

The Campaign Finance Task Force has completed an informational paper that covers a brief history of LWV action on campaign finance, what the LWV has done, is doing now and what Leagues can also do.

Tennessee Senators Alexander and Corker, and Maine Senators Collins and Snowe Urged to Support Disclosure