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Money in Politics

Elections should be about the voters not big money interests. It’s time to limit SuperPACs and secret donors to protect representative democracy.

Why it matters

Reducing the influence of big money in our politics makes our elections fairer. Voters have the right to know who is raising money for which political candidates, how much money they are raising and how that money is being spent. Our elections should be free from corruption and undue influence and should work so that everyday Americans can run for office, even if they aren't well connected to wealthy special interests. 

What we're doing

We fight to reform money in politics in Congress, with state legislatures, with the executive branch and, where appropriate, the courts. We are deeply committed to reforming our nation's campaign finance system to ensure the public's right to know, combat corruption and undue influence, and enable candidates to compete more equitably or public office and allow maximum citizen participation in the political process. 

Money in Politics In Depth

In addition to lobbying the 114th Congress in support of our priorities, the League is working on a number of important policy proposals put forth by the President and agencies of the federal government. We will also be participating in litigation that could have a major impact on laws and regulations.

"The League is pleased to have the power of the presidency behind reforms that lower barriers to voters and help us work toward a more perfect democracy," said President MacNamara.

On Tuesday, January 12 at 9 pm Eastern, President Barack Obama will deliver his final State of the Union speech. Read on for our five tips for how to get the most out of the address.

LWVUS joined a letter with organizations from across the country urging congress to reject amendments to the FY 2016 budget that would undermine the EPA's Clean Water Rule.

On Tuesday, we brought together supporters, policymakers and members of the media to introduce Dr. Wylecia Wiggs Harris as our newest executive director and to bid a fond farewell to our previous executive director, Nancy Tate who led the League for 15 years.

In 2016, our goals are very simple. We plan to: grow the vote, protect the vote and empower voters with information, through our nonpartisan voters’ guides and candidate forums and debates, and through our online tools—espeicallyVOTE411.org. These three priorities stand on their own, but are they are also inextricably intertwined.

The League joined with over one hundred other organizations urging Congressional appropriators to protect mandatory funding for farm bill conservation programs, support robust discretionary funding for Conservation Technical Assistance, and reject any attempt to undermine highly erodible land and wetland conservation compliance.

The League of Women Voters joined with other concerned organizations to urge the Internal Revenue Service to adopt new regulations that properly interpret the statutory eligibility requirements to qualify for tax-exempt status as a 501(c)(4) “social welfare” organization.

I will be stepping down in a few weeks after 15 years as the League’s executive director. I am confident that the League will continue its work to make American democracy as good as the ideals on which the country was founded.

The League joined other coalition partners in sending a letter to the Office of Management and Budget requesting continued funding for Great Lakes restoration priorities.