Skip to main content

Blog

We need your help to reach as many eligible voters as possible and let them know that on November 6th, we all have an equal say about our country’s future. Join our registration challenge by sending our e-card to *three* friends, family members or co-workers encouraging them to register to vote or update their registration by visiting VOTE411.org.

Testifying today before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the continuing importance of the Voting Rights Act, Elisabeth MacNamara, president of the League of Women Voters of the United Stat

Editorial Note: This piece was first published as part of the Huffington Post's Shadow Convention discussion on money in politics and on my Huffington Post blog.The growing influence of money in politics threatens to corrupt our representative form of government, where the people – through their votes – are supposed to make the decisions. 

On  Monday, September 3, in El Jadida, Morocco, over the course of three focused 90-minute sessions, 78 representatives of civil society organizations and governments--both men and women--from the Broader Middle East and North Africa met to discuss actions and changes that are urgently needed to empower women in the region.

Editorial Note: This piece was first published on my Huffington Post Blog earlier today.Forty-seven years ago this week, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the historic Voting Rights Act (VRA) into law to prevent voter discrimination. But as we have seen, the law is not just history; it remains vital TODAY to ensuring that every American can cast a ballot and have it counted.

Forty-seven years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the historic Voting Rights Act (VRA) into law.

There is more good news coming this week for women because of the Affordable Health Care Act (ACA). Beginning August 1st, millions of women around the country will be able to receive free preventive health care benefits. So, what does this mean in the day-to-day lives of women? A whole lot for their health!

Yesterday, the League of Women Voters of Wisconsin (LWVWI) released a report on their work observing the recent recall elections. LWVWI worked with the nonpartisan Wisconsin Election Protection coalition to train 152 citizens as volunteer election observers at 421 polling locations for the June 5th recall elections. LWVUS’ own Jeanette Senecal, senior director of elections, went to Wisconsin to observe the recall election, and blogged about her observations.

The latest study, “The Challenge of Obtaining Voter Identification,” from the Brennan Center reveals the extent of the obstacles challenging 3-4 million voters in affected states across the country – in both rural and urban areas – as they try to obtain valid voter photo IDs. It’s not at all easy, despite the claims of voter photo ID proponents.

Today marks the 164th anniversary of the start of the Seneca Falls Convention, which is often considered to be the start of the suffrage movement in America.On July 19-20, 1848, 300 hundred men and women gathered in Seneca Falls, NY to discuss the role of women in American society, and to debate the Declaration of Sentiments as prepared by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Stanton based the language of the Declaration of Sentiments on the Declaration of Independence.